Analysis > election

The hat-trick – three EPP prime ministers struggle in post-bailout elections

So it’s a hat trick – three in a row. First Portugal, then Spain, now Ireland. Three post-bailout countries went to the polls over the past five months. All were led by prime ministers from the European Peoples Party (EPP), the mainstream conservative block in Europe. All three emerged from their elections as the biggest party in parliament. None of them could put together a new government. And nor could the opposition (with the heavily qualified exception of Portugal – …

#GE16 – The first real social media election here

By Will Goodbody, Science & Technology Correspondent The votes have been cast, tallied and counted (well almost). The party enumerations, machinations and recriminations are underway. In the coming weeks, when the dust has settled, the candidates and parties will be reflecting on what went right, and in many cases wrong, with their campaigns. As part of that post mortem they will no doubt ponder what role was played by social media, who used it to maximum value and what could …

Protracted political hiatus means bigger borrowing cost

Despite the inconclusive result of the General Election, Ireland’s borrowing costs remain very low at 0.8%. It is not surprising there has been little movement, because it frequently takes some weeks for the markets to digest an evolving situation. There are some reasons to believe that Ireland will be able to avoid ruffling the feathers of investors for some weeks – as long as a stable solid administration is formed. The main political parties stated in their manifestos that they …

Science & Tech election positions under the microscope

By Will Goodbody, Science & Technology Correspondent With Election 2016 now just around the corner, the focus on policy and issues is intensifying. Science and Technology may not seem like the most important topics in the campaign. But in reality they cut across and influence many bigger and broader issues which the general population does care about. Like for example jobs and the economy, education, rural renewal, healthcare, privacy and much more. So what are the party positions on the …

The Coalition Question

We had such a busy show last Monday night that we didn’t get time to tell you about our poll result, but before I do, I want to thank everyone who took part in the programme this week, particularly those in our audience who have experienced homelessness or who are currently homeless. We heard stories from people who are in the most difficult circumstances imaginable, many of whom are trying to raise children in hotel or B&B rooms with no cooking …

Political Campaign School

Dáil Éireann: A cold place for women – There are currently 27 female TDs (16% of 166 TDs), which is the highest number of women in the Dáil ever – Only 95 women have been elected to Dáil Éireann in its history – Just 15 women have sat at Cabinet – Of the 4,745 Dáil seats occupied since 1918, only 262 have been held by women (Source: Women for Election) TDs were left stunned in 1992 when the then-taoiseach Albert …

'It's all left or right now'

A chance encounter on a Leinster House corridor last week should have alerted me; chatting to Michael Noonan about the water charge u-turn, the Finance Minister suggested that the steam was going out of the issue, but that the controversy had been very instructive -“it’s all left and right now”  he said,  or words to that effect. By Political Correspondent David Davin-Power

Romney takes lead to New Hampshire

By Richard Downes, Washington Correspondent, in New Hampshire So after Iowa, there’s New Hampshire. This tiny state has a better track record in predicting the winner of the nomination process than the midwest state and there is a lot at stake for all the candidates. For Mitt Romney, this is virtually home territory. He was governor of neighbouring Massachusetts and has been campaigning here for the last year. He still has a lead in the opinion polls, but that has …

Razor thin win for Mitt Romney in Iowa

By Richard Downes, Washington Correspondent,  in Iowa So after a pedestrian campaign that hadn’t caught alight, finally the American Presidential marathon is underway with a bit of pizzazz and a razor thin win for Mitt Romney. He hadn’t done much campaigning here in Iowa. The conventional wisdom was that this is such a conservative state that he didn’t stand much of a chance. Surely one of the tough right-wingers would come along and capture the hearts of the caucus goers? …

For a dull election, this is quite interesting!

Richard Downes, Washington Correspondent, in Iowa As the candidates keep up their hectic schedules in the final hours of the Iowa Caucuses, a picture of some sort is becoming clear. First, Mitt Romney appears to be doing quite well. Becky Beach, fundraiser and driving force in the Iowa Republican Party, has opted for Romney. She told us that it was a pragmatic decision, based on the belief that he could beat Barack Obama in the presidential election.