Analysis > Robert Shortt

Brexit Britain … where next?

London on Thursday was hammered with rain. Not just a few summer showers but full on downpours. Tube lines were flooded. Train lines were closed. Traffic ground to a standstill. The glass tower of The Shard building disappeared from view. Two polling stations in Richmond were moved due to flooding. It was, in retrospect, a dramatic backdrop to the decision of voters that day to end Britain’s membership of the European Union. The United Kingdom and the rest of the …

A Journey to the Heart of Brexit Britain

The tour groups shuffle respectfully past the stone tomb. A dappled pink light shines in from two brand new stained glass windows. The final resting place of Richard the Third in Leicester’s cathedral has become an unlikely tourist attraction. His remains, uncovered under a city car park, were reburied here with much pomp and ceremony last year. Now the stage villain king, killed at the Battle of Bosworth close to Leicester, has also been credited with the good luck enjoyed …

New Europeans

The coach lurched to a halt at a dusty crossroads. Rucksacks tumbled out. A small child was rushed out to get sick. The sounds of Arabic filled the evening air. Sixty men, women and children thus began the final walk from the northern edge of Serbia to Hungary. We joined them for the final few kilometres along the overgrown railway track which has become a well-known route this summer for tens of thousands of people from the Middle East and …

Inside Greece: Healthcare system in disarray

The mimosa trees are in full pink blossom along the dusty road which winds its way through an abandoned army base on the outskirts of Athens. Behind the wire fence is an ordinary, brick building. Inside is something extraordinary. It’s a busy afternoon at the Metropolitan Community Clinic of Hellinikon. Volunteers deal with a constant stream of patients. “We are not an NGO,” one of the volunteers, Christos Sideris, tells me. “We are a grassroots organisation.” Christos used to work …

Inside Gaza

People emerged from the rubble. Polite greetings at first and then the questions came. Was I here to take measurements? When were the bulldozers coming? When the small crowd heard I was a journalist, things didn’t improve. An elderly lady scolded me for asking questions. Would it not be better for me to help clear the rubble, she asked? Just let your camera shoot, another told me. The pictures will be more important than any questions. http://www.rte.ie/bosco/components/player/iframe.html?clipid=10416193&thumbnail=000a8ae8&autostart=true I was standing …

A surprise turnaround as banks return to profit

‘Bailing out the Banks’ has been spluttered out in vexed conversations up and down the country since the full horror of the financial crash became clear. But in the past year something has happened to change the calculations. It once may have seemed a distant and doubtful prospect but now it’s increasingly possible that the State may get back a considerable chunk of the €64 billion bailout. How much money can the Exchequer hope to recover from Irish banks? The …