The Fiscal Stability Treaty: what happens next?

Tony Connelly, Europe Editor, in Brussels What happens now that EU leaders have signed off on the fiscal compact treaty in Brussels? The first step is that the text will be translated into all 23 official EU languages (including Irish) and lawyers in each member state (26 since the UK is not participating) will check the text for legal compatibility in the relevant language.  That process should take a month, then it will be signed at the next EU summit …

Ireland's star still ascendent in Davos despite Taoiseach's remarks

  By Tony Connelly, Europe Editor, in Davos Despite the furore at home, Taoiseach Enda Kenny’s remarks that “people went mad borrowing” barely raised an eyebrow in Davos. The Congress Hall in the main Davos Congress Centre was about a third full when the discussion panel entitled Rebuilding Europe began at 1430 Swiss time. Across the scheduling spreadsheets there are dozens of meetings, forums, panels, debates in various formats over the six days of the World Economic Forum and in …

Taoiseach to discuss theme of "rebuilding Europe" at Davos

By Tony Connelly, Europe Editor, in Davos The Taoiseach Enda Kenny is to make his first appearance at the World Economic Forum in Davos later today.  Mr Kenny will take part in a panel discussion with the Danish and Finnish prime ministers and the president of Poland on the theme of rebuilding Europe. Earlier Mr Kenny will hold a bilateral meeting with the new Danish prime minister, Helle Thorning-Schmidt, whose government currently chairs the rotating presidency of the European Union.

Noonan to meet Draghi as Greek debt talks stumble

By Tony Connelly, Europe Editor, in Brussels Minister for Finance Michael Noonan will meet Mario Draghi, the ECB president, in Frankfurt later today. Although the two men will have met on the margins of EU finance ministers’ meetings, this will be their first formal meeting since the Italian took over from Jean-Claude Trichet in November. The government is still seeking to lower the €63bn portion of the country’s debt burden which relates to the bailout of Irish banks.  Dublin’s argument …